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Artists and scientists working together in creative programmes >>

  • ‘Invasive Aliens’ in Science Fiction
  • A naturalist’s thoughts on the issue of Invasive Alien Species
  • Reading Poetry, Rethinking Modernity
  • Seminar: Invasive Alien Species
  • Threats to biodiversity posed by Invasive Non-Native Species
  • The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha), http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dreissena_polymorpha.png

    The Art and Biodiversity Partnership invited various colleagues across a number of relevant fields to join an open discussion around the relationship between art and biodiversity. Artists, Scientists and Biodiversity Specialists gathered at the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts to share ideas on ‘Invasive Alien Species’, a controversial subject both in culture and biological sciences.

    This rather heterogeneous mix of people lead to a very inspiring session inflamed by a few short presentations aimed at broadening the range of topics discussed. The debate was moderated by Dr Veronica Sekules, Head of Education and Research at SCVA.

    David North, from Norfolk Wildlife Trust, introduced the subject presenting some naturalist’s thoughts on the issue of Invasive Alien Species. Tim Johnson, SCVA artist in residence for Basketry: Making Human Nature looked at the implications of working as an artist with plants and other natural material in diverse natural habitats.

    Mike Sutton, Co-ordinator of Non-native Species Initiative, Norfolk Biodiversity Partnership, discussed the threats to biodiversity posed by Invasive Non-Native Species in the UK, and elsewhere in the world. Dr Christine Cornea, Lecturer at the School of Film and Television Studies, UEA challenged the audience with the representation of ‘Invasive Aliens’ in Science Fiction.

    Dr. Antonio Cuadrado-Fernandez. Eco-poet, School of Literature and Creative Writing, UEA looked at ‘Invasive Alien Species’ in the context of contemporary indigenous poetry in Asia, Africa, South America and Indigenous Australia.

    The discussion that took place was extremely lively and people so passionate that we had a hard time in convincing everybody to leave the building!!

    “impressive group of people and a very diverse group of opinions that were offered”

    “enjoyable few hours”

    “Great job of bringing it all together and in facilitating the discussions and making sure that speakers were interesting”

    “very interesting and thought provoking to think about biodiversity from so many different perspectives”

    “After the talk I even had heated discussions at home, so I think the result was satisfactory!”

    “very stimulating, enjoyable and successful. The range of speakers and participants’ interests was fantastic, and I left with my mind whirling with ideas”

    “thank you for organising the event ,it was interesting to see so many different positions in one room!”